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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 108 (some duplicates have been removed)
are coming out on the streets and to vote in an election that matters. >> we'll be live with the latest on the french intervention and where north africa is the new front in the battle against terrorism. and we will be asking why the issue of abortion is still so divided. a special report from mississippi. >> also aaron is taking a look at global unemployment, and that is a huge number, aaron. >> it's a staggering number. 197 million people around the world are now without a jofpblet 13% are under 24. are we creating a generation of non-workers? >> it's 12:00 moon in london, 7:00 a.m. in washington and 2:00 p.m. in jerusalem where more than 5.5 million israeliings are expected to vote? an election that is expected to see benjamin netanyahu return to office. he is facing relidgeous parties and while security seen by many as netanyahu's strong point, the economy has also been a big issue. more from our colleague. >> yes. welcome to jerusalem where we will be broadcasting for the next two days. israel's election. driving to the heart of a sensitive but still stagnant process of peacemaking
and elsewhere around the globe. israelis went to the polls in general elections today. prime minister jet -- prime minister benjamin netanyahu claimed victory after exit polls showed he would likely lead, the government with a narrow majority. our correspondent is in jerusalem with the latest. >> welcome to jerusalem after three months of a lackluster election campaign. suddenly, israeli politics came alive today about an hour before the polls closed. there was growing excitement and speculation. as expected, benjamin netanyahu is likely to lead the next government. he will be the prime minister for the next four years, but it is a weakened prime minister. his coalition did not get the number of seats it wanted. only 31, according to exit polls. that is down from the 42 that the two parties had during the last election. what kind of coalition will be formed? it could be the right and religious parties. that is not what he wants. the television presenter, his party came in second place. he said his party will not expect to be in any coalition. will it be a shaky coalition between the right
the parliamentary elections this week. will they satisfy protesters or inflame them? we'll get the king's reaction. then, the prime minister of r h russia dmitry medvedev. some call it a new cold war. who's to blame and will russia help in syria? we'll discuss it all. >>> also, the algerian hostage crisis that left dozens dead. is this a sign of a grave, new terror threat? i'll tell you my view. >>> but, first, here's my take. every year at davos people like me try to get a sense of the mood of the place. take the temperature of people in this frosty mountain resort. obviously, i will give you a highly impressionistic and personal picture, but one i find useful since davod does bring together leaders and government, business and media and even the ngo community from all corners of the world. it is genuinely global in a way that few conferences are. so, what is the mood? well, there's a sense of calm, a relief that many storms that seem like they might be overwhelming like the euro crisis have been weathered. people from america are optimistic. those from emerging markets more so, but everywhere t
republicans are also pushing a bill that would also change the state's rules for electing a president. based on the congressional maps that virginia republicans gerrymandered back in 2012. so the same maps they have created to give themselves permanent majority, permanent victories in nonstatewide elections, they would also use those maps now to allocate virginia's electoral votes for president of the united states. essentially, rigging the presidential vote in virginia, using the exact same means that they have already used to rig the state level votes for republicans in virginia. we are hearing talk about republican plans to change the rules and thus rig the presidential in a bunch of states now. these are all states that tend to support democrats for president, but where republicans now control the state house, and the governorship. and they think they might be able to use that local republican control to change the rules by which those states contribute electoral votes for the presidency. this has very quietly and very quickly become one of the most important political stories in the cou
. president obama emboldened by his re-election has already drawn his so-called line in the sand. now republicans have to come to the proverbial table. perhaps the most powerful republican in washington, eric cantor, says he and his fellow republicans will have a plan and they are ready to deal. >> i think it's important that we be here as members of the u.s. congress. there are six of us who are here. really interested in the discussion about the global economy. obviously, the u.s. economy is still a global leader. we want it to remain that way. the political debate at home has been very much about jobs and the economy. and we're here listening to some of the leaders of the eu and other entities here trying to understand how they're dealing with their problems. and i think coming out of all this will be a renewed sense that in america we can compete and we will compete and we will continue to be the destination for capital and innovation. >> and we've got a natural gas boom, an oil boom, we've got thanks to low interest rates what appears to be some sort of a housing boom. so much mo
. the challenge to us is to remember what we learned when we first entered this movement, that you never elect someone to make change happen for you. you elect somebody to make it a little easier for your movement to keep on making change after. and so, brothers and sisters, i implore you tonight, have a good time, party caressed well, then get right back on the battlefield tuesday morning because we took our democracy back and we ain't giving it up to nobody. thank you and god bless. fire it up. fire it up. fire it up! god bless you all. >> that was president of the naacp, benjamin jealous, speaking at the peace ball, voices of hope and resistance come here in washington, d.c. on sunday night. we will be back with more from the peace ball couldn't angela davis, sonia sanchez and others in a moment. ♪ [music break] >> sweet honey in the rock performing at the peace ball last night. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we are broadcasting from washington, d.c., bringing you special coverage of today's inauguration as hundreds of thousands gath
concern. i want to play something that ted cruz, newly elected texas senator, republican, had to say this weekend, about gun control. and let's come back and talk about it. >> you know, there actually isn't the so-called gun show loophole, that doesn't exist. any licensed firearm dealer that else at a gun show has to have a background check. what it doesn't apply to is personal sales, one on one. and that's true whether it's at a gun show or -- >> i would point out, the key there is a licensed firearm dealer. some of these people, you can sort of apply as a, you know, you sell at a gun show occasionally, that's the gun show loophole. but, ted cruz gets to speak for lots and lots of people. how do you navigate, whether it's in delaware or nationally with what your father is trying to do, how do you navigate the politics of this? there's a reason the assault weapons ban sunseted in '04, because the politics of it simply didn't sustain. there's a reason barack obama didn't talk all that much about it in 2008. how do you keep the momentum to do something? >> the facts are important. sena
elected officials. i won. i won. i am far less naive today than i was four years ago but far more certain today who i am and where i want to take this country over the next four years. basically, that's what that peach was. >> what's the practical fact, he talked about climate change. he won't pass cap and trade through the house. >> when i heard that line, what struck me is this is the obama-care of the second ad administration. climate change is the sleeping dog issue that he is going to be what he will fashion piecemeal. i think that will be part of the second term legacy what he gets done. not so much the social stuff a lot of people certainly in the conservative movement concern themselves with, the bigger idea that falls into that broader vision. he reformed one six of the nation's economy with health care. now, he will go to the next level with global change on the environment. i see that as a sleeper and agree it was a very progressive speech. the idea he's putting a period on the reagan period saying this is a new day, we're going a new way and these are the agenda items i will t
before women got the right to vote. and now we just had a historic election where there are more women in congress than we have ever had before. it's really an incredible movement, and i work at emily's list, and emily's list has been working on it for 28 years to get more women on the pipeline. and we are picking it up. >> sam, it seems to me that the president was almost like an ich bin ein berliner speech. he's a man of color himself. but to embrace all of this together, i have never heard any of it -- none of this they. there was no they. it was all we, a lot of we. >> keep in mind, i thought the theme was that change can spark from the individual. in all these cases you have change being a grassroots entity, but it has to have a component of the state and government to help foster it, and the line that really stuck out to me was these truths can be self-evident, but they're not self-executing. what he made was a case for why there is an important role for the government to play to basically protect our rights but also to advance us as a society whether it's on climate change, immi
on what happened to them in the last election. gun control. more republicans backing things like background checks, they stand a good chance of getting stuff done in the next year, while the president has the leverage on his side. >> okay. let's look at another couple of challenges for you, ed. sequestration, that starts march 1st. debt ceiling suspension expiring on may 19th. you think the president's policy goals will get bogged down because of these upcoming deadlines? >> that's an interesting question. we are trying to sort that one out. this punt into may, with the debt ceiling suggests that it buys everyone time on fiscal issues and might allow congress to turn its attention to immigration and gun control and other issues. certainly, the fiscal debate isn't going anywhere. a big question, will sequestration indeed happen if it does happen, does it happen assith currently written, do we make changes or the white house come up with a way to stave it off and get republicans and democrats to agree? a big push under way to get started on gun control, immigration, hearings next w
from the election, he speak out as the vice presidential nominee saying moving forward the gop needs to lay out its vision with even more specifics and with a broader appeal. >>> meanwhile, the nation's capital today there was a powerful unprecedented show of public sentiment in gun control. the million mom march brought together thousands from all over the country including 100 people from newtown, connecticut. parents, pastors and gun violence survivors calling for action in the wake of the murders at sandy hook element y elementary. >> this time we, the people, will act. we're stepping up and this time we will not step back! >> and what it's counting on is for us to get the newtowns, for us to forget the virginia techs. >> the march comes one day after vice president joe biden held a roundtable talk about gun control in virginia. kristen welker is at the white house and joins me now. when can we expect the president thoims ta himself to take the gun control debate on the road? >> reporter: i think you can expect president obama to hit the road and talk about gun control in the ne
about whether or not you're in favor of term limits for all elected officials. termresident already has limits. your governors, senators, mayors, city council, dog catcher, tax collector. are you in favor of term limits, yes or no? here are the numbers. host: you can also reach out to us by social media. host: i want to show you some of the numbers from the recently released gallup poll. they ask americans support for establishing term limits for federal lawmakers. suppose on election day you could vote for key issues as well as candidates. or againstote for the number of terms congress and senate can serve? nationally among adults those voting for term limits are in the 75% range. those who say they would vote against term limits, 21%. those who had no opinion, 5%. breaking it down among political parties, republicans, those voting for, who say they would vote for term limits, 82% of republicans questioned in this gallup poll, 82% say they would vote for term limits. 15% say they would vote against. 3% say they have no opinion. independence, 79% say they would vote for term limits. 17%
inaugurated four days ago. >> right. >> and you're talking about elections four years from now. >> yeah, and i am, as you know, steve, i am still secretary of state so i am out of politics an i'm forbidden from even hearing these questions. >> as steve martin would tay mussily say, excuse me. they asked to come on "60 minutes." they like the press coverage they got today and last night. they love the fact we're talking about it. it seems to me for him to mock the very message when they are the message is a little weird on the part of the president. >> please, steve. did you see the body language on hillary. that's a woman who knows the presidency is basically hers for the taking if she wants it. who could stop her? she knows it. she's as relaxed as i have ever seen her. the best thing to do is step back, get out of this job, and spend the next three years preparing herself to run for president if she wants it. >> was this a move -- so many things in politics follow other things that wouldn't have happened if they didn't have that thing before them. do you think this was to give her a really ni
ryan sat down for his first talk show appearance since the election. the congressman told david gregory that it is premature to talk about whether he will run for president in 2016. >> i represent wisconsin and i am chairman of the budget committee. i think i can do my job representing the people i work for by focusing on that right now than focusing on these distant things. >>> a new anti-chuck hagel ad has popped up. the ad is from a conservative group called americans for strong defense. at least five other groups from the right and left are a organizing to block hagel's nomination. the president out on tuesday. republican congressman paul ryan said both parties are waiting on the president. >> the question many of us are asking, is he looking to play politics or does he want to solve the problem? we don't know the answer to that yet. we know there are a late of democrats in kwg who want to solve this problem, fix this mess and many of us agree with that. >> white house correspondent peter alexander joining me live. on tuesday can we expect to hear from the president about actual leg
have that very long, hard, primary campaign. in politics and in democracy, sometimes you win elections, sometimes you lose elections. and i worked very hard, but i lost. and then president obama asked me to be secretary of state. and i said yes. and why did he ask me and why did i say yes? because we both love our country. >> let me bring in political reporter for "u.s. news and world report" lauren fox and white house reporter david nakimura. david the first sit down interview the president has done with anyone other than the first lady. why do this? why do it now? >> i think t.j. the timing is secretary of state has served for four years. now she's leaving. she's had a bit of a tough run lately with her personal health and the situation in benghazi where the consulate came under attack. four diplomats were killed. she was in a hearing just last week. i think the president wanted to sit down and show a real thanks first of all and a show of support as she leaves. it will be interesting obviously as speculation comes in a couple of years whether she'll run for president against possibl
, working to desegregate the deep south. >> the fact that obama could be elected again shows that the stone of hope, it came out of the mountain of despair that king spoke of and there is hope. >> reporter: a sentiment likely shared by so many on the mall today, including the man they all came to see. cecilia vega, abc news, washington. >>> and here again, george stephanopoulos, great to spend the day with you. so, did anything happen today that changed the political possibilities? >> i don't think so. one day, one speech cannot dot that. even though this is the day where all of america comes together, and that was one of the big themes of the president's speech. but one of the things i did think we saw today was a very changed president. and this is a very different time and a very different president from the one who took office four years ago. the speech four years ago, a dark speech. for a dark time. we were mired in crisis. the economy beginning to come back. and what you saw today is, the president gave a meditation on freedom and equality. it was a president who else felt free. >> an
. in this conversation we have the rear picture -- rare picture of king advising johnson how he's going to get re-elected in 1968 by getting the southern blacks registered. johnson is advising king -- johnson, who detests demonstrating in the streets, as most elected officials did -- is giving king clues about how he can make those demonstrations more effective. here we go. sound, lights, camera. someone let me know whether we have it or we don't. because i'm going to keep on talking. at any rate a close working relationship became even closer as civil rights movement and people in congress tried to put an end, finally, for all time, they hoped, black citizens being denied the right to vote. the first crisis came at the edmund pet tiss bridge -- pettis bridge in selma, alabama. king's lieutenants started off on a march from the town of selma, across the bridge with the stated intent of marching to montgomery. none of them had toothpaste or backpack -- a few of them had backpacks. it was a challenge. the idea was to produce a confrontation. and it did. i'm sure all of us have seen the pictures of sherr ri
the racial progress our society has made, on the civil rights movement to the re- election of president obama, the pervasive association with black people and the ghetto betrays a persistent cultural lag. it has been two generation since .chools were desegregated if till were alive today, would remember stories of lynchings peppering the "new york times." he would remember the william man -- million -man march. a black man became president of the united states. he would have been 73 had he lived. thank you. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> we have been joined by taylor branch. i will just let you know that we have been speaking. douglas blackmon spoke. elijah anderson spoke. i would invite you to the podium and talk about the attempted second emancipation proclamation. ladies and gentlemen, taylor branch. [applause] >> thank you. thanks, paul. i don't want to pay tribute to the marc commuter line. i was only on for two extra hours. i am glad to be here. i want to pay tribute to the " washington month
with one of john barrow's election ads. that ad was also repugnant. >> absolutely. it absolutely is. extremes are always their own side's worst enemy. i don't think there's any comparison, the nra to this organization. but just reality check here. barrow is one of the few remaining blue dog democrats left in the south. he's an endangered species. the fact that he's being targeted by a liberal group for running an ad trying to say he's strong second amendment doesn't make sense. it reminds me an old line lyndon johnson used to use. what's the difference between liberals and the cannibals? cannibals won't eat their friends and family members. so i don't think this ad is particularly helpful. >> very funny. perhaps true because it hits close to the mark. hogan, what about this, why can't the head of the nra just apologize and just, you know -- why is he standing by that ad? it makes him look bad. >> it does. look, i said this, i've said this many times, if the nra had used this type of language and said something like, look, we are about responsible gun ownership in this country, we're
day one after the election. i think they're ready to come out with something. i think you're going to see that marco rubio has laid a lot of the groundwork by selling these principles. he's gotten great endorsement and support from some of the most right-winged pundit makers. now it's time to act upon it and grow it from there but it is basically the only thing happening in congress today where there is a bipartisan movement on both -- in both chambers and both sides of the aisle. >> but, ana, i've been hear about about marco rubio and the gang of six. why haven't we heard from them? >> timing is everything. you know what, don lemon? i wouldn't put money on them waiting on the president. the president's going to speak on tuesday. i wouldn't be surprised if these senators who are tremendously strategic and know how to play the political game and defend third bipartisan process, i wouldn't be surprised if they preempt the president, do it tomorrow, do it before the president does on tuesday. these are not folks that wait on the president. these folks act. >> so you think they may com
in the last election to republicans. particularly mitt romney with the latino voters. he lost big time. and that's why when i asked senator mccain and others who were standing right here where i'm standing, half a dozen years ago, why this is different, that's why they answered that way. listen to this. senator kennedy stood with you and, senator mccain, you were standing with him, and he said 2007 is the year we must fix our broken system. we must strike while the iron is hot. what makes you think, why is this year different? >> elections. elections. >> the republican party is losing the support of our hispanic citizens. and we realize that there are many issues in which we thing we're in agreement with our hispanic sit steps but this is a preeminent issue for those citizens. >> wolf, it's important to underscore that we really did see some of the people who have been here before, with senator kennedy and others half a dozen years ago, but some newborn faces like marco rubio who of course is an up and coming conservative who has made this issue one of his own, because of the fact that
insist they better change or risk further election. >>> a wave of unrest leaves more than 50 dead and a state of emergency in egypt over islamist policy. >>> ice storms and snow headed to the mideast. a possible breakthrough to help migraine sufferers. and the president obama on hillary clinton and the outlook for 2013. >> you guys in the press are incorrigible. i was literally inaugurated four days ago. and you're talking about days ago. and you're talking about elections four years from now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> and a very good morning to you. nice to see you today. i'm veronica de la cruz. this week, president obama puts immigration reform front and center on his agenda. on tuesday he will outline his overhaul in a major speech in las vegas, and even a bipartisan group of senators is on board to reform the system that impacts 11 million undocumented people in america. tracie potts has details for us. good morning. >> reporter: veronica, good morning. remember, this was a first-term promise not kept by president obama. tough time getting this through
that got him e re-elected and the way he paid tribute today. >> he came up late in the civil rights movement and always said that he regretted that. this is what he finally proclaimed with such passion today. you can look at his life and doctor king and the rise of civil rights in a very personal way. the day barack obama was born, four civil rights workers were arrested in louisiana. on august 4th, the civil rights act was passed by the senate. so there's so much history that was sort of, you could see it in his face today, i think in a more profound way than even is first inaugural. >> well, he comes from an unusual background. he comes from an imgrant mother who left the scene, white mother, middle american mother raised in hawaii and raised again in indonesia. >> so he had to construct an identity where he discovered, constructed, i think, because it was a deliberate process. he wrote about it in dreams for my father, his first book, it's been written about by others. and the identity that he constructed is an african american man. he went into the community in chicago, he -- yo
. the next two flags are the flags the u.s. adopted when the president elect's home state became part of the u.s. the middle flag represents the 50 states. president obama plus home state illinois entered the union and 18 -- in 1818, making it the 21st state to join the union. the two flags towards the center, they will display 21 stars. dole in new york, the independent line. -- joel in new york, the independent line. >> i love c-span. inauguration day is a proud day for every american, regardless of party affiliation. i want to address the first caller about poverty. i am a second-generation american, and if you cannot make in this country, you'll be doomed to failure in any other country. host: julie, salt lake city, good morning. caller: i want to thank you for taking my call. i lived in a completely republican state. thank goodness that president obama has prevailed, because i do believe that the majority of people, even though i do it in a republican state, a lot of them did vote for him. unfortunately, i wish we would get rid of the electoral vote and go to the popular vote. i
's debt. joining me now to debate those issues, chuck schumer of new york and newly elected republican senator ted cruz of texas. welcome back as senator cruz to "meet the press." back to both of you. i want to start on the gun debate. because as i say, even before the second term is officially underway thissy is bait is well underway. here are the highlights of what the president wants to accomplish. universal background checks. he'd like to pursue a ban on high capacity magazines. an assault weapons ban that lapsed in 2004. and he'd like stricter laws on gun trafficking. but senator schumer, just as i challenged wayne lapierre of the nra very hard when this came up, i challenge you as well with a question of, is this really going to make a difference? and rich lawry wrote something that caught my attention in "the national review." no one can write a law against mothers owning guns that one day might be turned against them by deranged sons who then commit horrific acts of murder-suicide. shooting rampages are hard to prevent because they are so often committed by young men with no cr
to not comment between the election and inauguration because i wanted to see what kind of president we are looking at here. what kind of path he was putting his administration on, and all of the statements and comments lead me to my he is thinking more of a political conquest than political compromise. >> we will have more on that in just a moment. >>> also, a big week ahead in washington. hillary clinton set to step down as secretary of state this week and the gnat will hold a hearing on kerry to replace her. meantime in a new interview with the new republic president obama says gun control advocates need to listen to their opponents and understand and respect the tradition of hunting. he added that he enjoys skeet shooting at camp david. president weighed in on the dangers of football. they have been making headlines lately. he said if he had son he is not sure he would let his son play football. head over to the white house right now. peter alexander, some interesting stuff in that interview the president gave the new pacific republic, not just football and skeet shooting. >> that's
election, for example, i think the most racially divisive comment of the entire election was joe biden's comment where he said if the republicans win, they are, quote, going to put y'all back in chains. that made my heart weep to see a sitting vice president playing to racial fears and playing on those issues. i think that's unfortunate. i don't think it has any place in politics. >> chuck hagel, you were very tepid on "meet the press" a couple of weeks ago. >> i was. >> now you've met with him, you're more comfortable, you'll support him? >> i am. >> what changed? >> i said on your show that i had real concerns. i spent 90 minutes with him. i asked him very specific questions on the things that troubled me. his answers were forth right. and they were answers that alayed my concerns. should we keep every option on the table to prevent a nuclear iran? yes. i went further. i said, do you think we can tolerate a nuclear iran? he said no. and i said to him, well, then, if we had to use military as the only choice, would you? he said yes. second, i asked him hezbollah and hamas, should they
super bowl and mardi gras and a costume. >> chris christie want to be re-elected. he's the republican. what do you make of this? >> i think it's an interesting dynamic. most people think of silicon valley with the democratic party but often times you see someone who has lived in a state who support the guy who is doing a good job. i think it's a good sign for dom governor christie. >> i don't think it's a good sign. i think it's a great sign. you have mark zuckerberg and trying to get re-elected. >> wolf f. i know he's married but he can friend me. i'll be very friendly to mark. friend me. >> guys, thanks very much. >> thank you. >>> manti te'o is not alone. an apparent hoax involving football players from the washington redskins. [ male announcer ] when we built the cadillac ats from the ground up to be the world's best sport sedan... ♪ ...people noticed. ♪ the all-new cadillac ats -- 2013 north american car of the year. ♪ for a limited time, take advantage of this exceptional offer on the all-new cadillac ats. exceptional offer did you just turn your ringer off so no one would
in election in two years. >> this and other difficulties appeared miles away as mr. obama recited the constitutional oath that cemented the start of his new term. >> i did it. >> sasha was referring to the mix jum four years ago where the chief justice and the president said some of the words of the oath out of sequence prompting a do-over here at the white house a couple of hours later. as sasha said nobody messed up this time and as said a couple of moments ago, that's probably not too bad. >>> robert gibbs was an adviser to the obama campaign and served as the white house's first press secretary. welcome. >> thank you. >> you have seen it you have read it, characterize it. >> i think it's hopeful, and it talks about the values and the visions and the ideals that bring us to this very moment as america. you'll hear the president talk a lot about what we have to do in this country together to make progress on the big challenges that we face. and, look, it's not just -- one party can't solve these issues. not even just those in government can tackle these
this being a triptic, which was the election night speech and the inaugural speech, and now we have the state of the union. what do we expect from that in terms of how aor specific on the policy that he gestured towards yesterday. >> i think he has to keep up this pressure going forward, and i think the real question i think we'll be looking for tea leaves in the state of the union address to what extent does he want to keep these as issues and continue building momentum. he believes coming out of the 2012 election that there is an emerging majority that will only get stronger going forward, and he talked to the white house. they talk about what they can get done in the next two years. the next four years. our work will not be done here. >> the work begins anew. >> the work will continue after me. so on an issue like global warming, there is not some big legislative package coming this year on global warming. they don't even have democratic votes for that. what obama is doing is seeding the ground, beginning the discussion to kind of shift the popular perception of global warming, and that is
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 108 (some duplicates have been removed)

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